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The ANSCHUTZ TARGET RIFLE in .22RF


Not until the late 1950s, with post war austerity still in evidence, were many small-bore target rifles available in Britain other than the BSA range and the comparatively expensive imported Winchester 52 and Remington 37 and 40X models. Here is an image from an advertisement for the Anschutz 54 rifle in 1958, which "ad" stated that these rifles were being imported into Britain as a result of their International and National competition successes.

By 1962, the now World famous Anschutz SuperMatch had been introduced. With the SuperMatch's purpose designed three-positional (Standing, Kneeling and prone) equipment, there appeared a need for a purpose built prone rifle

By the 1966, the Model 64 had been introduced

Shown below is a hand-built walnut and steel scale model of an Anschutz Model 1411 - of 1970s vintage.

The rifle is barely 7" long; and the .22 Long Rifle cartridge beneath is in perfect proportion.

Below is an example of a late 1990s Anschutz SuperMatch rifle, minus its rear-sight, and with the 1411 prone stock, used for the same round-actioned barrel, underneath for comparison.

From these times, Anschutz never looked back, their rifles being frequently used to gain success at the highest levels of International competition.

Their 21st. Century models led the way in non-wood "skeletonised" alloy stocks, now built by many competing manufacturers. Wooden stocks are, however, not past their sell-by date. Many high achieving target shooters still prefer them, which has required manufacturers to continue production and development of the traditional rifle.

Below are images of a British owned, customised, modern Anschutz.

It has been fitted with walnut furniture, replacing the layer stained multi-coloured laminated furniture supplied with the rifle.

The walnut fore-end, pistol-grip and cheek-piece are each specially shaped to conform with the shooter.

A multi-adjustable "Gemini" butt-plate has replaced the Anschutz original, and an extension tube is fitted to the barrel to extend the sight-radius for better fore-sight focussing.

The superb adjustability afforded by modern stock design is apparent in the two following images.

as is a degree of patriotism

This rifle is heavily canted for prone shooting. The rear-sight and fore-sights are therefore rotatable to bring them upright at the selected cant of the rifle. A spirit level is fitted to the barrel's rear scope mounting block, and visible through the sights, to ensure a constant rifle and sight angle is maintained to prevent shots falling low either side of the centre-line of the aiming point.

If you wish to date your Anschutz rifle, the means is available post 1958.

Their own website shows the following information.

"Up to approx. 1958 only the proof test stamp and the kind of ammunition was imprinted on the barrel.

From approx. 1958 to approx. 1968 apart from the proof test stamp also the last two digits of the referring year were imprinted on the barrel.

Since approx. 1968 the year of manufacture is coded. The code for determining the age is as follows:
0=A; 1=B; 2=C; 3=D, 4=E; 5=F; 6=G; 7=H; 8=I/J; 9=K
The year of proof testing is described by the last two digits of a year, i. e. that a firearm with the letters AF was officially proof tested in the year 2005 (05).
"

See also DATING YOUR RIFLE ( of any British type )


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